Archive for the 'Zachary Ruden' Category

Proposal 5.0

April 3, 2012

Our writing systems have evolved through many cultures and technologies over the course of thousands of years. This lends specific historical/cultural associations to many letterforms and type styles. Of course, our own culture adds new dimension to these associations. The application of content, too, compounds new sets of associations to typefaces. The combination of these elements can lead to surprising effects on meaning.

Through the use of homographs, a comparative study can determine to what extent typefaces effect homographic interpretation and produce a measurable outcome that can be analyzed to evaluate which (styles of) typefaces are effective for conveying intended connotations of various applications. The methodology of this study, titled Typeface and the Connotative Interpretation of Textual Information, implements web based surveys to gather information. Participants will look at a homograph and decide which definition of the word came to mind first and then proceed to the next page where they can select that definition. Every participant will be given the same survey but in a different typeface (randomly selected from five typefaces). The differences in results from the surveys will reveal the impact of the typeface on the participants’ interpretation. The typeface is the only variable to change between surveys.

The results of this study may allow educated users of type to check if their connotation relates to that of their intended audience and also help the layperson improve the clarity of his/her message by offering a guide to effective typeface selection.

From the results of the surveys, I will write about the study. The writing will explain the purpose, means, implications and etc. of the study and will be designed to look attractive whilst maintaining a optimal functionality in disseminating scientific information.

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HSIRB approval

March 1, 2012

My study has been approved by HSIRB.  This means that I can start experimentation, which is quite exciting after such strong efforts to get the project to this point. The design of the survey has been generally made up, the homographs and typefaces have been chosen and so I find myself anxiously awaiting the launch of the surveys, a long anticipated milestone in this project.

Proposal 3.0

February 24, 2012

Zachary Ruden

2/21/2012

Proposal 3.0

Communicating Faces

Typeface and the Connotative Interpretation of Textual Information

 

As a ubiquitous tool in communication, typography is commonly

used to support, augment, or alter the content of the message it

dresses¹ ². There is a lack of research on the effects of

typographic factors on the interpretation of text that yields

meaningful results to the applied field. I am interested in

substantiating a practical reasoning to guide, or at least verify

typographic decisions, and in particular typeface decisions. I will

achieve this by investigating the effect that prefabricated character

sets (or fonts) have on the interpretation of text. Through the use of

homographs³ a comparative study can determine to what extent

typefaces effect homographic interpretation specifically, and

thereby produce a measurable outcome. Analysis of the survey

information will go to evaluate which (styles of) typefaces are

effective for intended interpretation of various kinds of application.

With this information, I will compose a publication spread layout,

concentrating on employing all the design elements to best

communicate the findings to a larger audience effectively and

stimulating visually. A further application of the results will

minimally be proposed if not developed into a final and usable

piece.

 

1. Binns, Betty. Better Type, 1989, p. 8

2. Anderson, Donald. The Art of Written Forms, 1969, p. 254

3. Mariam-Webster Dictionary,

Homograph: One or more words spelled alike but different in

meaning or derivation or pronunciation.

Homographs For Survey

February 24, 2012

(Definitions from Marian-Webster Online unless otherwise marked with an *)

Homograph:

one of two or more words spelled alike but different in meaning or derivation or pronunciation

Cool

1. moderately cold : lacking in warmth

2. marked by steady dispassionate calmness and self-control

Bat

1. a usually wooden implement used for hitting the ball in various games

2. nocturnal usually frugivorous or insectivorous flying mammals

Content

1. satisfied

2. something contained; topics or matter treated in a written work

Fair

1. marked by impartiality and honesty; just*

2. a gathering of stalls and amusements for pubic entertainment*; buyers and sellers in a

particular place

Fine

1. free from impurity; very well

2. a forfeiture or penalty paid to an injured party in a civil action

Console

1. to alleviate the grief, sense of loss, or trouble

2. an electronic system that connects to a display

Wave

1. to motion with the hands or with something held in them in signal or salute

2. a shape or or outline having successive curves

Sign

1. a posted command, warning, or direction

2. to affix one’s name to; ratify or attest by hand or seal

Letter

1. a symbol usually written or printed representing a speech sound

2. a direct or personal written or printed message addresses to a person or organization

Arms

1. human upper limbs

2. a means (as a weapon) of offense or defense

Inspirational spreads/layouts/designs

February 24, 2012

Lately…

February 16, 2012

I have been meeting with supporting professors, Dr. Johnson and Dr. Razi, quite frequently in the last few weeks and as we advance the structure and concept of my thesis, so has the visual exploration. I have began generating a method to graphically represent the statisical information I will receive from the study, this will help demonstrate the implication of data in a meaningful way to larger audience.  It will become an integrated part of the design for the article spread.

The results, regardless of what they my be, should be very interesting and I am excited to show what they mean visually. My mind is frantically searching for solutions to bridge the gap between the abstract world of numbers and the experience of their application.

 

Proposal update

February 16, 2012

Proposal ~2.1/2

 

As a ubiquitous tool in communication, typography is commonly used to support, augment, or alter the content of the message it dresses. There is a lack of research on the effects of typographic factors on the interpretation of text that yields meaningful results to the applied field. I am interested in substantiating a practical reasoning to guide, or at least verify typographic decisions. I will achieve this by investigating the effect that prefabricated character sets (or fonts) have on the interpretation of text. Through the use of homographs (words that are spelled the same way but have different meanings) a comparative study can determine to what extent typefaces effect homographic interpretation and thereby produce a measurable outcome that will be analyzed to evaluate which (styles of) typefaces are effective for intended interpretation of various applications. With this information, I will compose a publication spread layout, concentrating on employing all the design elements to best communicate the findings to a larger audience effectively and stimulating visually. A further application of the results will minimally be proposed if not developed into a final and usable piece.

Meeting with Dr. Douglas Johnson (Psychology)

January 31, 2012

I had a meeting with Dr. Johnson to propose my thesis idea and request assistance from the psychology department. I was curious to see if my ideas were valid and if they could yeild meaningful, publishable results. Furthermore, I needed to understand the process of what I am trying to acheive in terms of time and effort. Would it be possible to acheive what I intend to within the time frame allotted by the perameters of this semester? The meeting was encouraging. He seemed intrigued by the topic, convinced that time wouldn’t be an issue, and confident that it would be a publishable work by the end of the semester. We went over my ideas and possible executions of them, and we finished with him requesting a fuller-bodied abstact to review, which I have since emailed to him.

Proposal 2.0

January 31, 2012

Typography And Homophones

I am interested in substantiating a practical reasoning to guide typographic decisions. To date, and to my knowledge, there have been various studies done to refine and understand typography in terms of aesthetics and legibility, but not as a contextual element that may prime the mind for particular interpretation. I think that type choices ought to be made with the impact of the reader’s interpretive reception in mind. To access the mental reaction of the viewer to different typefaces in terms of interpretation, I will use homographs (words with the same spelling but different meanings) to gain a standard of measurement. Using homographs, which are inherently ambiguous without a greater context, I plan to measure the effect that typography (as context) has on the interpretation of textual information, if there is any. In the end, I would like to have sets of information derived from survey results that through analysis will reveal statistical tendencies on the effects of typography on interpretation. An info-graph will then be designed from composited findings to explain, explore and make public the results.

Initial Correspondence (Informational Systems)

January 31, 2012

Hello Dr. Tarn, I was referred to you because I am seeking assistance from your department. I was told that you or perhaps students of yours might be able to help. I am planning a study that will require the development and use of an online databank that would store and hopefully organize certain interactions within a web site that I will be launching. I am in the graphic design program and I am attempting to coordinate a thesis project with an emphasis on research and analysis of information. The purpose of the proposed study is to measure the effects of typography on the interpretation of homographs. I hope that we might be able to meet to discuss the project in its fuller form and to find out if there would be any resources available to aid in the realization of my thesis. Please contact me at zachary.a.ruden@wmich.edu or 248.884.4427.

Thanks,

Zachary Ruden